The Open Championship

 

British Open, popularly known as the Open Championship or the Open, is one of the four major golf tournaments in the world, along with the U.S. Open, the Masters Tournament and the Professional Golfers Association (PGA) Championship.

The Open, since it was held in 1860 in the United Kingdom, is the only golf major that is held outside the United States. It is currently ranked as the third major of the year, between the U.S. Open and the PGA Championship and is usually held in mid-July.

History

It was on October 17, 1860 that the first Open Championship was played at Prestwick Golf Club in Scotland. The tournament was participated by eight professionals who played three rounds of the 12-hole course in just one day. The winner of the inaugural tournament was Willie Park, Sr. and was awarded with the Challenge Belt, a silver-buckled leather belt that each champion was to keep until the next season of Open.

In 1861, they welcomed amateurs into the tournament and it was in 1863 that they introduced a purse of £10. This will be the prize to be shared among the professionals who finished in second, third, and fourth place. Cash prize of £6 for the first place was only added in 1864.

Tom Morris Jr. won the Open for the third consecutive time in 1870 and as a result, he was allowed to keep the Challenge Belt permanently. In 1872, the Golf Champion Trophy, now commonly known as the Claret Jug was given to the winning golfer. The Open became a 72-hole event (four rounds of 18 holes) in 1892 and a cut (reduction of the field) after the first two rounds of play was introduced in 1898.

Professional golf players often dominated The Opens, with only six amateurs who took the victory, the last of which was Bobby Jones’s third Open. Golf became especially popular in the mid-20th century and as result, string of noteworthy Open champions were produced, including England’s Sir Henry Cotton (winner in 1934, 1937, and 1948), South Africa’s Bobby Locke (1949–50, 1952, 1957), Australia’s Peter W. Thomson (1954–56, 1958, 1965), and the United States’ Arnold Palmer (1961–62) and Tom Watson (1975, 1977, 1980, 1982–83). After Watson’s final win, there was only one American winner for the next 11 years.

The Open became part of the PGA Tour’s official schedule in 1995. The winning of John Daly that year has restarted another period of American supremacy at the Open in which 10 of the next 13 winners are from the United States, including Tiger Woods.

Jack Nicklaus is another notable Open champion, who won in 1966, 1970, and 1978 and was ranked in the top five 16 times, including seven second-place finishes. Other player who made The Open record was Harry Vardon who got the most number of championships with his winning the Open six times.  South African Gary Player holds the record for the most appearances in the Open.

Click here for the comprehensive list of The Open Championship winners.

The Courses

One of the pre-requisite venues for the Open Championship is that is has to be played on links courses (mostly golf courses that are treeless and are built along a coast and retains the nature of its location as uneven terrain).

The Open was exclusively played at Prestwick Golf Club from 1860 to 1870 and was rotationally played on a number of courses since 1872. Initially the three courses were St. Andrews, Prestwick, and Musselburgh, all situated in Scotland.The nine courses in the current rotation are Carnoustie Golf Links in Carnoustie, Scotland;the Old Course at St. Andrews; the Ailsa Course at the Westin Turnberry Resort, outside Girvan, Scotland; Muirfield in Gullane, Scotland;Royal St. George’s Golf Club in Sandwich, England; Royal Troon Golf Club in Troon, Scotland;Royal Lytham & St. Annes Golf Club in Lytham St. Annes, England;Royal Birkdale Golf Club in Southport, England and Royal Liverpool Golf Club in Hoylake, England.

The Open is an important event to amateur and professional golfers alike. Whilst other majors are typically held in sunny locales in the United States, the influence of weather plays an important factor in the outcome of The Open. On a links course, morning and afternoon tee times can produce vastly different playing conditions, depending on the breeze that comes in off the sea.

The weather is just one of the numerous features of the Open that combine with its prestigious reputation and long history, makes it an unparalleled event in golf.

2018 Open Championship

The 2018 Open Championship marks the 147th Open Championship and it is scheduled to be held on July 19-22, 2018 at the Carnoustie Golf Links in Angus, Scotland. It will be the eighth Open Championship played at Carnoustie.

2018 Ticket Prices

Children aged under 16 years on 14 July 2018 will once again be admitted free of charge while viewers under 24 years old on 14 July 2018 are entitled to buy the Youth tickets. Those who are 25 years old and above should purchase the Adult tickets. You can book your tickets online.

Youth Daily

From 1 February until 30 April 2018

From 1 May 2018 onwards

Sunday 15 July

£ 10

£10

Monday 16 July

£15

£15

Tuesday 17 July

£15

£15

Wednesday 18 July

£20

£20

Thursday 19 July

£35

£40

Friday 20 July

£35

£40

Saturday 21 July

£ 40

£45

Sunday 22 July

£40

£45

 

 

Adult Daily From 1 February until 30 April 2018

From 1 May 2018 onwards

Sunday 15 July

£15

£15

Monday 16 July

£25

£25

Tuesday 17 July

 £25

£25

Wednesday 18 July

£30

£30

Thursday 19 July

£70

£80

Friday 20 July

£70

£80

Saturday 21 July

£80

£90

Sunday 22 July

£80

£90

Weekly tickets which gives you admission for week  (Sun 15 – Sun 22 July) is  £270 for adults if you purchase them until April 30th and  £310 if purchased from May 1st while it’s  £130 for youth and  £150 if purchased from May 1st.

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